Cannabis and Cancer: Proven Cannabis Cancer Treatment Options

In the past few years, we have seen mainstream media focus on cannabis shift away from counterculture stereotypes as we hear more and more remarkable success stories regarding the medicinal value of the plant. Beyond being a proven treatment for epilepsy, pain, glaucoma, and more, cannabis has shown tremendous promise in the field of cancer treatment. While some are still skeptical of cannabis’ ability to shrink tumors and manage other forms of cancer, research on the subject is building quickly and we are seeing many patients use the treatment with great success. We’ve complied a list of 10 recently published medical studies to give you an idea of some of the research that’s being done, and where it’s heading. Each study focuses on attempted medical cannabis cancer treatment for different types of cancer. Take a look at the list below to discover some of the fascinating and promising research that is being done today. By the time you get to the end of this article, you may be wondering why on earth these treatments haven’t been approved for further clinical trials.

Current Cannabis Cancer Treatment Studies

  1. The Journal of Neuroscience (http://www.jneurosci.org/content/21/17/6475.abstract) recently published a study that evaluated attempts to use THC (the main active compound in cannabis) to reduce the onset of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Using MRI technology, the researchers determined that the introduction of THC significantly lowered the onset of symptoms. More research in this field could lead to exciting new treatments for neurological diseases.
  2. The British Journal of Cancer (http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/v95/n2/abs/6603236a.html) published a study conducted by the Molecular Biology department at Complutense University in Madrid, whose goal was to determine if THC could inhibit tumor growth. In this clinical trial, humans with cancer were administered THC treatments and monitored for reduction in tumor size. The doctors later claimed that the THC was administered safely and with no psychoactive effects, and actually did reduce tumor size in some of the patients.
  3. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therepeutics published a study whose results determined that THC and CBD (cannabidiol) dramatically reduced breast cancer cell growth. This further confirms the potential effectiveness of cannabis as a treatment for breast cancer.
  4. The US National Library of Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22198381?dopt=Abstract) recently published a study that determined cannabinoids can significantly inhibit cancer cell evasiveness in the lungs.
  5. The US National Library of Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3339795/?tool=pubmed) published another study confirming a decrease in prostate cancer cell size and aggressiveness through engagement of cannabinoid receptors.
  6. The US National Library of Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22594963) published yet another study which essentially claimed that clinical testing of CBD products against prostate carcinoma (cancer) is a must. They determined it to be exceptionally effective, thus urging further clinical trials.
  7. The American Journal of Cancer (http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/66/13/6748.abstract) published a study determining that cannabinoid receptors are expressed in pancreatic tumor cell lines at much higher levels than normal pancreatic tissue. Results showed that administering cannabinoids induced apoptosis, as well as reduction of growth, and decrease in spread of the tumor cells.
  8. The US National Library of Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16908594) published a study conducted by Virginia Commonwealth University which determined that cannabinoids induce apoptosis in Leukemia cells
  9. The US National Library of Medicine (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20516734) published a study whose results show cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of cellular respiration and are toxic to malignant oral tumors (mouth cancer).
  10. The International Journal of Cancer (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.23584/abstract) published a study which also determined that cannabinoids exert proapoptotic effects in many types of cancer and in mantle cell lymphoma.